Our North American RV Tour – Charlottetown to Halifax

The Atlantic Ocean the coast of Prince Edward Island
The Atlantic Ocean the coast of Prince Edward Island
Sept. 21 Thursday – Day 23 – Last Day in PEI
The next morning at our ‘Boondocker Welcome’ hosts brought cold temperatures, 6 Celsius, heavy mist and a rising red ball barely visible through the mist. The chilly morning required the heat of the trailer furnace, the first time since the beginning of the trip.

 

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Click this link to check out free RV camping with other RVers, join for less than one night at an RV park
 Today we plan to fulfill Lois’s dream, tour a lighthouse. Allyson found the perfect spot, Point Prim, the oldest round brick lighthouse in Canada.

 

Point Prim lighthouse Prince Edward Island, Canada
Point Prim lighthouse Prince Edward Island, Canada
Most east coast lighthouses were built in the early to mid-1800’s as navigational aids for cargo ships and fishing fleets.
The first lights were fashioned after a typical household oil lamp of the time although much bigger. First fueled by seal oil and then kerosene. The lighthouse keeper slept in the lighthouse usually on the floor or on a cot close to the light in case a problem developed.
Touring Point Prim lighthouse Prince Edward Island, Canada
Touring Point Prim lighthouse Prince Edward Island, Canada
If the light went out during the night any ship sight would be rendered blind and vulnerable.
The keeper’s job was to maintain the light, the lighthouse and the grounds around it. A lighthouse keeper was a job sought after because of regular pay, a rare opportunity in the 1800’s.
There are many more facts about the lighthouse I will not bore you with except for the fact many of the existing lighthouses are in danger of falling into the ocean from centuries of erosion.
Inside Point Prim lighthouse Prince Edward Island, Canada
Inside Point Prim lighthouse Prince Edward Island, Canada
Point Prim is no exception, the 9 acres it once stood on has eroded to 1/3 rd the size, fortunately, the shores around it have been stabilized to slow erosion thanks to the Point Prim Lighthouse non-profit society.
After the lighthouse, we treated ourselves to an amazing seafood lunch at a nearby oceanside restaurant the Chowder House, I indulged in a delicacy of baked oysters in a cream and panko sauce, delicious, my mother’s favorite.
Lunch at the Chowder House Point Prim, Prince Edward Island, Canada
Lunch at the Chowder House Point Prim, Prince Edward Island, Canada
Next, we’re off to the Prince Edward Island National Park a red sand, sunny and windy experience on the exposed Atlantic coast.
We all touched the waters of the Atlantic soaking our feet as if to satisfy some unwritten superstition. For some of us this may be the only time this will happen.
The Traveling Shooter left to right, myself Lynda, Lois, Ralph, Allyson, and Henry, Prince Edward Island, Canada
The Traveling Shooter left to right, myself Lynda, Lois, Ralph, Allyson, and Henry, Prince Edward Island, Canada
The waves crashed along the shore as we drove south to Charlottetown and a much-anticipated Atlantic Lobster Feast.
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Click this link to join for free RV parking with other RVers
 We arrived in the capital city early afternoon a couple of hours to spare before our dinner reservations. Even though it was a bright sunny afternoon a crisp fall feeling was in the air.
We parked near the water and wandered around the harbor touristy areas checking out the sights, hand-built lobster boats, and several old stone churches.
Charlottetown harbor, Prince Edward Island, Canada
Charlottetown harbor, Prince Edward Island, Canada
Old churches dominate the old towns of the east coast, a striking contrast to the west coast, which brings to mind the conclusion, ‘there must be many more sinners in the east’…… LOL
Historic Church Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
Historic Catholic Church Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
Unfortunately, a historic building we were looking forward to visiting was under restoration and not open to the public.
Historic Church Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
Historic Catholic Church Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
Provincial House, where delegates from the entire country gathered in 1867 for negotiations and the signing of the documents of Canadian Confederation.
After wandering historic Charlottetown we stopped at a sidewalk cafe for a break enjoying Cow Ice Cream, beer, and sangria, a weird combination I thought.
We continued our walk about until it was time for our lobster dinner at Prince Water Corner, the location as well as the name, recommended by friends of Ralph and Lois.
The appetizer was almost a meal in itself, 2 dozen muscles per person with bread and liquid butter, very tasty.
The appetizer 2 dozen muscles, Prince & Water St. Charlottetown, PEI
The appetizer 2 dozen muscles, Prince & Water St. Charlottetown, PEI
We ordered 1 ¼ lb whole lobsters, accompanied by French fries or baked potato. The waitress ceremoniously tired bibs around our necks to protect our clothing.
I can take one off my bucket list, a fresh Atlantic lobster feast. This was Lynda and my first experience eating a whole lobster.
We soon caught on and were crunching and devouring lobster like the rest of the barbarians in the restaurant.
A lobster feast fit for a king, Charlottetown, PEI
A lobster feast fit for a Viking, Charlottetown, PEI
Everyone was happy with their meal although Allyson thought the lobsters were slightly overcooked. The group finished the meal sharing pumpkin cheesecake….yum.
We arrived back at camp just before dusk to an excited Buddy dog. Another propane campfire, a recap of our day and a discussion about the next day’s drive to Halifax then off to bed.
Hand built lobster boat, Charlottetown Harbor, PEI, Canada
Hand built lobster boat, Charlottetown Harbor, PEI, Canada
Prince Edward Island is beautiful, a park-like island with rolling fields of famous PEI potatoes, hay and corn. A quiet place, no rush hour to speak of, and a temperate climate, one of Canada’s beautiful places.
PEI is tiny in comparison to other Canadian Provinces, about 230 kilometers long and 64 kilometers wide, driving the entire coast in one day is doable.
PEI is almost flat with the highest point at less than 500 ft. above sea level and not overpopulated with less than 200,000 people.
A Chinese Junk, tourist boat PEI Canada
A Chinese Junk, tourist boat Charlottetown, PEI Canada
Friday, Sept 22 –  Day 24
Another traveling day 362 kilometers to Halifax, Nova Scotia, about 4 hours driving time, but by the time we stop for fuel, lunch and a photo op it will take us all day. A cool humid morning greeted us as we hit the road.
The sun poked through the clouds as we made our way off the island.
The drive to the 13-kilometer-long Confederation Bridge was slow, winding through scenic rolling farmland. We arrived at the bridge and paid the $62.50 ransom.
The bridge deck was rough with an irritating thumping over expansion joints.

 

The Confederation Bridge Nova Scotia to Prince Edward Island
The Confederation Bridge Nova Scotia to Prince Edward Island
Once across the rough bridge, everyone needed a potty break probably from all the bumping, we pulled into the Nova Scotia visitor’s center.
We were soon back on the Trans-Canada Highway and improved road conditions probably the result of federal money.  The landscape returned to boring virtually flat land and forests with the odd coloring of fall.
Traffic was relatively light through this sunny Friday, we arrived at Shubie Park Campground, Dartmouth around 3 pm under cloudy skies and 20 degrees.
Dartmouth is a ferry ride across the harbor from Halifax, the capital of Nova Scotia.
The group was looking forward to a few days rest. Our plan was to spend 3 nights at Shubie Park Campground the longest stop to date.
We were looking forward to long showers, electricity and laundry facilities. It has been 3 weeks since we’ve had the luxury of an endless supply of water and electricity. Most of our stops have been boondocking dry camping spots.
Shubie Park Campground, Dartmouth Nova Scotia, Canada
Shubie Park Campground, Dartmouth Nova Scotia, Canada
Once settled I headed out to find a barber for a haircut, which I should have gotten before we left, I was beginning to look like dog pound candidate.
We spent the evening around the propane campfire, the park firewood was too expensive 6 pieces for $10, not sure why it’s so pricey there are plenty of trees in Nova Scotia.
Shubie Park Campground, Dartmouth Nova Scotia, Canada
Shubie Park Campground, Dartmouth Nova Scotia, Canada
We spent a pleasant evening around the campfire planning our next day’s  activities including a visit to Halifax.
Before sightseeing apparently, some chores need to be done, laundry, showers, and house cleaning for the women while the guys catch up on rig maintenance chores before seeing the sights in Halifax.
So far we have traveled more than 6000 kilometers, since leaving the west coast of Canada. The trailer and truck tires need to be checked for wear and pressure.
The trailer bearings also should be checked and a shot or two of grease via the bearing buddies. Some mechanics do not trust bearing buddies.
I’ve pulled many trailers for thousands of kilometers and always used bearing buddies to apply grease to the bearings every 10,000 kilometers or so.
The only time they have failed is if they become plugged, although I remove the hub once a year to check the bearings for wear and grease.
Tomorrow Halifax.
Shubie Park Campground, Dartmouth Nova Scotia, Canada
Happy Hour, Shubie Park Campground, Dartmouth Nova Scotia, Canada
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If you join through this link I will receive a small commission, helps with my costs, thanks, Gord.
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My next article, visiting Halifax and Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

Thanks for visiting.

Gord B.

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